Daily Log Notes: Musket Cove, Fiji – Surf Spectaculaire

6-4-2017, Tuesday 23h15 – About Musket Cove and the surf.

Now on watch, I have a bit of time to recount some of our adventures in Musket Cove. From Suva, the most southeastern city of the island Viti Levu, we wanted to head west to the Western Mamanuca Islands and the renowned Musket Cove Marina and Yacht Club. With an obligatory $5 processing fee, we each became lifetime members. The Mamanuca Islands of Fiji are central to some of the best surfing in the world, boasting the legendary Cloudbreak, rated one of the top 10 waves in the world. Incidentally, the International Volcom Fiji Pro Surf Competition happened to be in full swing. As we were sailing up to Cloudbreak, we could see the hubbub and gathered boats, onlookers and surfers so we anchored the boat and hurriedly rigged up the dinghy for the boys to get close and check out the quality surf and male competitors. Bryce and Trent were ordered to be back by 15h00. Sure enough, they returned on time bubbling over with excitement, ready to haul-up anchor in order to make Musket Cove and its protection from the open ocean swell before sunset. We had a small glitch raising the anchor. The anchor, 50+ feet below, with a strong current was likely stuck on corral. Bryce quickly donned his mask and fins and dove overboard. With one hand on the chain and the other to clear his ears, he free dived as close as he could get. On his first attempt, he couldn’t get close enough to see the problem. Eric told him he didn’t have to get to the anchor, just see what it was doing. The second time, after relaxing and getting a solid breath, he plunged down the anchor chain again, determined to succeed. Once down, he realized exactly how the tip of the anchor was stuck. Under his directions, we motored forward over the corral head and with a strong tug, the anchor came free. Whew! Bryce saved the day!

This is the Cloudbreak wave that we saw. It can get much much larger.

Easily anchored in popular Musket Cove, we stayed put for a quiet dinner on board. Bryce was the only one who ventured out to the marina resort with the dinghy that night to try and learn how to taxi over to the various surf spots: Swimming Pools, Tavarua Rights, Second Reef, Wilkes, Restaurants and Cloudbreak. The next day, we organized a boat and I went with the boys that first afternoon. That day, our goal was Cloudbreak, but the weather was so rough and windy that we decided to stop at a closer spot called Wilkes.

The next couple times, Eric went with them to videotape. Each time it was our own private taxi boat, a little costly, but worth it, in case one spot was blown out, they could then go over to another. In all, the boys got to surf Wilkes again, Second Reef and Cloudbreak. Normally during the competition, the Cloudbreak wave would have been off limits to non-competitors, but when the competition was paused four days to wait for bigger waves, it presented perfect conditions for Bryce and Trent, so they headed over. While surfing, Bryce recognized his favorite pro surfer, Gabriel Martinez. Bryce paddled over and shook his hand. Cool beans! Eric was there video taping. Hopefully they got some good shots. Haven’t yet looked at all the media. After Fiji, the boys won’t be getting much opportunity to surf, so we really supported them to get out to the reefs everyday. Trent too had great success surfing. Bryce constantly encouraged him, which made for a happy Trent. The boys got in 4 days of great surfing.

We forgot to collect sand, darnit. I’ll have to contact Kurt Roll, a surfer/sailor/drone flier ex-patriot who lives on a modern south pacific style studio hut-boat in the Musket cove Marina. He took the boys surfing one afternoon. Maybe he’ll collect some sand for us and mail it back to Ventura for our growing collection. Every place the boys surf, we commemorate it with a vial of sand.

We also met some Danish sailors, a couple and family of 4 with 2 sons of similar age. I approached them for a game of beach volleyball. We played together a couple times and enjoyed a couple BBQ dinners and happy hours together. The father was a minister. We had much to talk about and share. Eric had recognized their sailboat from the Papeete Marina the summer before. It was lovely to meet such culturally interesting people.

The Musket Cove Resort was gorgeous and high class. We felt so spoiled being able to enjoy it without having to pay the high daily resort fees. We even got a chance to walk to the adjacent island during low tide to visit a nearby local Solevu village and school. The central village buildings were solidly constructed in cement blocks. The outlying thatch homes and structures were similar to the Polynesian style – open without glass windows. The villagers were friendly and the children at play were full of smiles and polite ‘hellos.’ Bryce had a great time amusing two little boys giving them piggy-back rides and playing ‘Catch me if you can.’ The walk back across the pass was a bit more challenging. Up to my thighs in water, I sloshed back as quickly as possible conscious of the ever rising tide and wanting to keep my clothes away from the salty water….laundry is always a consideration, of course!

Lautoka, Viti Levu, Fiji Sugar Cane Plant.

6-4-2017 To Lautoka, Viti Levu from Musket Cove.

Departed Musket Cove and headed back to the main island of Fiji, Viti Levu to anchor outside the east coast city, Lautoka, to provision and check-out of Fijian customs and immigration. Lautoka is a sugar-cane oceanside town, less important than Suva. It is quite modern with a brand new shopping mall sporting many fancy shops, a restaurant court and a fancy movie theater. The downtown was large with a McDonald’s, several gas stations and well-paved streets. Apparently a Hawaiian owns all the McDonald’s in Fiji. After provisioning one afternoon, the boys and I hired a taxi to carry our many bags of groceries back to the boat and asked the taxi driver to give us a quick city tour. He brought us to a couple colorful Indian temples, drove us through nice residential areas and passed by the very large sugar cane plant. There were lines of trucks loaded with long poles of sugar cane waiting to enter. The air smelled sweet surrounding the factory. Kandu was anchored just opposite that factory and the exterior of our boat became immediately dusted from the filthy black soot blowing across the water from its hot fires.

 

4 thoughts on “Daily Log Notes: Musket Cove, Fiji – Surf Spectaculaire”

  1. Loved reading about the surf competition and the chance meeting of Gabriel Martinez. Yaaay, Bryce. And then another layer of YAY in diving down to solve the anchor mystery.

    We just returned from Santa Cruz where we watched 5 final days of the Tour de France with my longtime friend and her hubby. We participated in a 6 mile run/walk with 45 bands lining the route. Bill&Annie were leaving for N Carolina the day after we saw them; they sure make the effort to visit Martine’s gals. Scott now has 3 kidlets (the newest is a boy, Sawyer) and Allison’s boy is a year and 2 mo. They are all fun to be around.

    Leaving for Kauai for 3 weeks mid-Sept, and then New Zealand for 5 weeks this February (my brother retired with his NZ wife and moved to the north island.)
    Looking forward to reading about your further adventures! XO Cick and Rindy

    1. Cindy and Rick – Always soooo great to hear your news and know that you’re following along. It is quite some work to write, edit, then post. We love reading your responses and getting caught up on your lives and home. Please congratulate Scott and his lovely family on bringing in a certain to be incredible soul to this world of ours. It is a great place to be…we’re re-discovering that everyday of our travels. You’re future travels to Hawaii and NZ are certain to be full of beauty and adventure. As you read, we loved New Zealand. So many fun things to discover and experience. The Tour de France was in California? Did I understand that correctly? I don’t think there is a Santa Cruz in France. Anyway, sending you virtual hugs and much much love to you all. Leslie

    1. Kathy – Wow – It has been such a long time since we’ve been in contact and you’re following our blog and travels! So nice to hear from you. Thanks for commenting, otherwise I would not have known. How are you and your brother and parents. I think of you all so very fondly. I was reminiscing about you recently and bemoaned the fact that we had lost contact. I’d love to hear how you’re doing. We get online sporadically and then I tend to be dealing with finances and issues and posting to our blog. Write me back on my email account: Leslie@rigneyskandu.com. Please give my best to your family. Leslie

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